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Friday 26th & Saturday 27th January 2018

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At Burns Baby Burns you can expect the lights, colours, sounds, and smells of a Scottish Hooley in an 18th century Highland castle, in the middle of Bethnal Green.

A traditional three-course Burns supper is prepared by executive chef Charlton Nichol and his team; a giant haggis is promenaded into the great hall with Highland pipes before being ceremonially severed by our host.

Hear the lassies mockingly toast the laddies (and the laddies’ colourful response),  the thunderous recitation of Burns’ most famous works, and, of course, the most wild, exultant, ceilidh south of Lanarkshire from the UK’s most riotous ceilidh band, The Ceilidh Liberation Front.

Burns Baby Burns is, quite simply, the brightest and best Burns Night celebration south of the border.

Tickets

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Friday 26th & Saturday 27th January 2018

from 7pm at York Hall, Bethnal Green, E2 9PJ

 

Your ticket includes:

A 3 course meal

A Dram of Whisky

 Ceilidh & other Burns Night entertainment

 

Your Host

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Taking the role of ‘Laird of the Manor’, the host presides over the ceremony and leads the assembled revellers in the Burns rituals throughout - The Welcome, The Selkirk Grace, the Ode to the Haggis, the toast to the lassies, the immortal memory - the list of readings and rituals goes on. There is a specific structure to Burns Nights, all informed by the work of the man himself.

Our hosts in previous years include acclaimed comedians Phil Kay and Jay Lafferty.

The Dance

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The ceilidh for Burns Baby Burns will be brought to you by the Ceilidh Liberation Front, London’s most radical and most colourful ceilidh band. Subverting the lore of the ceilidh with their energetic new regime, they breathe vigour and vitality into traditional dancing, whilst honouring its roots and traditions.

United under the banner of The Nest Collective, London’s brightest folk club, and originally brought together by Mercury music prize nominee Sam Lee, this ceilidh ensemble is a coming together of the finest musicians, the most charismatic callers, the most uplifting and inspiring tunes, and the best dances; mostly traditional, with some bespoke dancing creations, and the odd spontaneous improvisation!

The Venue

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For 2018 Burns Baby Burns moves to York Hall. It’s a short hop from Bethnal Green or Cambridge Heath stations to this grand old building. Dating back to 1929, it befits the stately grandeur one of the UK’s largest and most extravagant Burns Night celebrations.

York Hall, 5 Old Ford Rd, Bethnal Green, London E2 9PJ

What is Burns Night?

(& who was Robert Burns?)

 

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Burns Night celebrates the life and work of legendary Scottish poet Robert ‘Rabbie’ Burns through feasting, literature, and dance. The events take place on or around his birthday (25th January) and have become synonymous with high revelry and wild good times.

Each year at the end of January, Burns suppers are held on all around the world, replete with whisky, tartan, haggis, and ceilidh dancing, plus readings of Rabbie’s songs and poems. Over the years Burns has established a cult following, from which specific customs and rituals have evolved, many of which we observe at Burns Baby Burns, although always with our own twist!

Born in Dumfries in 1759, Rabbie was a prolific writer of songs and poems. He is revered as Scotland’s national bard, is regularly voted as the greatest ever Scot, on top of being cited by Bob Dylan and Michael Jackson as an influence! His most works are still very much in the public canon, with Auld Lang Syne and A Red, Red Rose perhaps the best known.

Rabbie was famously a rogue and a womaniser, fathering 12 children to 4 wives, and died tragically young age 37 with reputedly only £1 to his name.  His work is now celebrated in Burns clubs all around the world, and a copy of his poetry has travelled 5.7 million miles, orbiting the earth in the pocket of astronaut Nick Patrick.